Thoroughly Mexican Cheeses

 

People in Mexico love cheese, and there’s quite a variety. Suffice to say that depending on the classification, Mexico can boast some 20 to 40 cheeses that are 100% domestic in origin. Most are fresh types, since the Mexican palate is not accustomed to the strong flavors of aged cheese.

You’re probably familiar with some of them, others perhaps not, but they’ll all make your mouth water, for sure.

People in Mexico love cheese, and there’s quite a variety. Suffice to say that depending on the classification, Mexico can boast some 20 to 40 cheeses that are 100% domestic in origin. Most are fresh types, since the Mexican palate is not accustomed to the strong flavors of aged cheese.

You’re probably familiar with some of them, others perhaps not, but they’ll all make your mouth water, for sure.

 

Cotija Cheese. Made with unpasteurized milk from Holstein cows and zebu, it has a strong, salty flavor. It was first made in Cotija, Michoacán and was considered the “best foreign cheese” in a recent competition.

Chihuahua Cheese. This yellow cheese has a clear flavor and aroma and melts easily. It was brought to the state of Chihuahua in 1920 by Dutch Mennonites who settled there.

Panela Cheese. Fresh, white in color, with a somewhat porous, soft texture, it is made in baskets that leave the marks of the weave on the cheese. It is, therefore, also known as canasta (basket) cheese.

Oaxaca Cheese. Also known as string cheese, it is fresh and mild in flavor. Originally from Etla, in the state of Oaxaca, it stretches and forms strips that melt easily.

 

Bola Cheese. Produced in the Mexican southeast, it resembles Dutch Edam. The round cheese is coated with red wax and is the basis for the acclaimed dish from Yucatán, stuffed cheese.

Poro Cheese. From the state of Tabasco, it is made in square wooden molds, which causes the holes, the so-called pores (poros, in Spanish) that imbue its tasty personality.

Mexican Manchego Cheese. Although it comes from the Spanish cheese by the same name, at this point, the two have very little in common. Made with pasteurized cow’s milk, it has a smooth, firm texture and melts easily.

 

 

Cream cheese from Chiapas. With an acidic flavor, it has a creamy texture but also crumbles. This cheese is a star of the luscious Chiapanecan cuisine.

Añejo Cheese. One of the country’s few strong cheeses in terms of flavor and smell. Made in Mexico State, it is aged for 20 days and also undergoes a year maturation period.

Tetilla Cheese. From Rosamorada, Nayarit, this variety is only made during the rainy season. Its interior is soft, and it has a conical shape for which it is named (literally little tit).

 

These are merely some of the delicious cheeses made in Mexican, but there are many more. We suggest taking a trip around the country and enjoying its tasty products, all Mexican and all delectable.

 

Foto de portada: Shutterstock

Foto de inicio: Shutterstock

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